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John Williams Plans To Retire After Fifth ‘Indiana Jones’ Film

HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 09: (EDITOR'S NOTE: Image has been converted to black and white.) AFI Life Achievement Award recipient John Williams speaks onstage during American Film Institute’s 44th Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute show to John Williams at Dolby Theatre on June 9, 2016 in Hollywood, California. 26148_002 (Photo by Mike Windle/Getty Images for Turner)

It’s a day we always knew would come, and feared. After more than half a century scoring films, John Williams is hanging up his cape.

In an exclusive interview with The Associate Press, Williams hinted that Indiana Jones 5 would be the last feature he scored.

“At the moment I’m working on ‘Indiana Jones 5,’ which Harrison Ford — who’s quite a bit younger than I am — I think has announced will be his last film,” Williams said. “So, I thought: If Harrison can do it, then perhaps I can, also.”

Now, it should be noted that Ford has not publicly said anything about retiring from film. However, it does seem as if this could be his character’s last outing. There has much been much speculation that the next installment could see the character officially passing off the torch to someone else – perhaps even Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s character.

Spielberg attempted to do something similar with Shia LaBeouf in 2008, and we all remember how that turned out.

But Williams doesn’t seem to be closing the door on all music-making. He said, “I don’t want to be seen as categorically eliminating any activity.” He added that a big reason he’s considering retiring at all is because the films he’s usually recruited to score take so much time, something he acknowledges he does not have much left of.

“A Star Wars [film],” he says, “at this point in life is a long commitment to me.”

Williams turns 90 this year. And that’s given him plenty of time to reflect on what a rich and wonderful life he’s lived and provided scores of music for (quite literally).

“It’s given me the ability to breathe, the ability to live and understand that there’s more to corporal life. Williams said. “Without being religious, which I’m not especially, there is a spiritual life, an artistic life, a realm that’s above the mundanities of everyday realities. Music can raise one’s thinking to the level of poetry. We can reflect on how necessary music has been for humanity. I always like to speculate that music is older than language, that we were probably beating drums and blowing on reeds before we could speak. So it’s an essential part of our humanity…It’s given me my life.”

SOURCE: AP